Saturday, March 31, 2012
naijaboyzay:

England’s Smartest Family is Nigerian: We won’t hear about this in the news….. England’s Smartest Family is Black Meet the “First Family of Education” in England . They are black. Peter and Paula Imafidon, 9-year-old twins from Waltham Forest in northeast London , are a part of the highest-achieving clan in the history of Great Britain education. The two youngest siblings are about to make British history as the youngest students to ever enter high school. They astounded veteran experts of academia when they became the youngest to ever pass the University of Cambridge ’s advanced mathematics exam. That’s on top of the fact they have set world records when they passed the A/AS-level math papers. Chris Imafidon, their father, said he’s not concerned about his youngest children’s ability to adapt to secondary school despite their tender age. “We’re delighted with the progress they have made,” he said. “Because they are twins they are always able to help and support each other.” To Peter and Paula’s parents, this is nothing new. Chris Imafidon said he and his wife have been through this before: they have other super-gifted, overachieving children. Peter and Paula’s sister, Anne-Marie, now 20, holds the world record as the youngest girl to pass the A-level computing, when she was just 13.  She is now studying at arguably the most renowned medical school in the United States , Johns Hopkins University , in Baltimore . Another sister, Christina, 17, is the youngest student to ever get accepted and study at an undergraduate institution at any British university at the tender age of 11. And Samantha, now age 12, had passed two rigorous high school-level mathematics and statistics exams at the age of 6, something that her twin siblings, Peter and Paula, also did. Chris Imafidon migrated to London from Nigeria in West Africa over 30 years ago. And despite his children’s jaw-dropping, history-making academic achievements, he denies there is some “genius gene” in his family. Instead, he credits his children’s success to the Excellence in Education program for disadvantaged inner-city children. “Every child is a genius,” he told British reporters.  “Once you identify the talent of a child and put them in the environment that will nurture that talent, then the sky is the limit. Look at Tiger Woods or the Williams sisters [Venus and Serena] — they were nurtured. You can never rule anything out with them. The competition between the two of them makes them excel in anything they do.”

naijaboyzay:

England’s Smartest Family is Nigerian:
We won’t hear about this in the news…..
England’s Smartest Family is Black
Meet the “First Family of Education” in England . They are black.

Peter and Paula Imafidon, 9-year-old twins from Waltham Forest in northeast London , are a part of the highest-achieving clan in the history of Great Britain education. The two youngest siblings are about to make British history as the youngest students to ever enter high school. They astounded veteran experts of academia when they became the youngest to ever pass the University of Cambridge ’s advanced mathematics exam. That’s on top of the fact they have set world records when they passed the A/AS-level math papers.

Chris Imafidon, their father, said he’s not concerned about his youngest children’s ability to adapt to secondary school despite their tender age. “We’re delighted with the progress they have made,” he said. “Because they are twins they are always able to help and support each other.”
To Peter and Paula’s parents, this is nothing new. Chris Imafidon said he and his wife have been through this before: they have other super-gifted, overachieving children.
Peter and Paula’s sister, Anne-Marie, now 20, holds the world record as the youngest girl to pass the A-level computing, when she was just 13.

She is now studying at arguably the most renowned medical school in the United States , Johns Hopkins University , in Baltimore .
Another sister, Christina, 17, is the youngest student to ever get accepted and study at an undergraduate institution at any British university at the tender age of 11.
And Samantha, now age 12, had passed two rigorous high school-level mathematics and statistics exams at the age of 6, something that her twin siblings, Peter and Paula, also did.

Chris Imafidon migrated to London from Nigeria in West Africa over 30 years ago. And despite his children’s jaw-dropping, history-making academic achievements, he denies there is some “genius gene” in his family. Instead, he credits his children’s success to the Excellence in Education program for disadvantaged inner-city children.
“Every child is a genius,” he told British reporters.

“Once you identify the talent of a child and put them in the environment that will nurture that talent, then the sky is the limit. Look at Tiger Woods or the Williams sisters [Venus and Serena] — they were nurtured. You can never rule anything out with them. The competition between the two of them makes them excel in anything they do.”

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

TRIGGER WARING: RAPE [in video and below description]

"If you could see yourself, would you see rape?" With this question, a controversial new ad campaign in the UK aims to change the way teens view rape. The public service announcement uses shock value to convey the fact that rape doesn’t always take the form of a violent attack from a hooded criminal — it can happen within committed relationships.

The perception-altering ad is aimed at teens who might never associate rape with themselves or their group of friends. The 60-second video depicts a nice-looking teenage boy watching himself from behind a glass wall as things are getting heated with his girlfriend. Initially they’re kissing and nothing seems to be wrong, but he becomes forceful and the girl resists his advances — at this point, the boy begins screaming at himself to stop and pounding on the glass.

READ THE REST:

(Source: seriouslyamerica)

Friday, November 18, 2011

petitefeministe:

The rubber gloves are on: marchers to fight for women’s rights amid cuts

Lizzy Davies, Guardian:

Hundreds of demonstrators will take to the streets in rubber gloves, headscarves and full-skirted frocks on Saturday to protest against government cuts which they say are hitting women disproportionately hard and risk setting the battle for equality back decades.

In what it describes as its first nationwide "call to arms" in nearly a century-and-a-half of activism, the Fawcett Society is urging people to turn out in 1950s gear for a march past Downing Street aimed at telling David Cameron not to let austerity measures “turn back time” on women’s rights. Similar rallies in other cities, including Coventry, Bristol and Manchester, are to culminate in tea parties. In Oxford, a 1950s-themed “flash mob” is to take place: the most committed participants are urged to come in handcuffs with which they can chain themselves “to the kitchen sink”.

For an organisation which tends to shy away from more raucous feminist tactics in favour of measured, persistent campaigning, Fawcett’s Day of Action is a departure. But, in a week when the number of women out of work across the country hit a 23-year high of 1.09 million, Fawcett’s acting chief executive, Anna Bird, said there was no time to lose.

"We think we are very much at a watershed moment for women’s rights in the UK," she said. "We think that the impact of austerity has brought us to a tipping point where, while we have got used to steady progress towards greater equality, we’re now seeing a risk of slipping backwards. We cannot afford to let that happen."

The warning comes amid growing concern that women will be hit hardest by cuts to benefits and public services such as SureStart children’s centres, and will be more likely to take on roles plugging the gap once such state services have been withdrawn.

It is, above all, in the job market that some organisations, including Fawcett, believe the damage will be done: as 65% of the public sector workforce, female employees will be disproportionately affected by job cuts. The TUC, which this week released a "tool kit" guide to raising awareness about the impact of the cuts on women, estimates that 325,000 of the 500,000 people who will lose their jobs as a result of public sector cuts will be women.

Dave Prentice, general secretary of Unison, said: “Is it any wonder that the coalition are losing the support of women voters? It is a triple whammy for women who are being hit hard by unemployment, the rising cost of living as well as cuts to benefits and services to young people.”

For Saturday’s march, activists all over the country will be rallying support. Chloe Cook, 20, the head of Bournemouth Students’ Feminist Society, said she and her friends had been inspired to take action at last weekend’s Fem 11 conference in London. “This is probably the most important feminist cause for British women to fight for right now. We need to remind the government that ‘women’s issues’ aren’t just ‘women’s issues’. They are society’s issues,” she said.

Alongside those marching in solidarity will be those who have experienced first-hand the impact of the cuts. Maggie Cowan, 59, from Walthamstow in north-east London, is one of those: after working in the careers service for 22 years, she was made redundant in July as an indirect result of local authority cuts to Connexions advice centres. Because of the closures, the organisation that employed her decided to close its head office. Of about a dozen of her colleagues, only one was male.

Since September, she has had a part-time job on a temporary contract working with young people to try to keep them in education. But the summer was hard. “I was anxious. Looking for work is difficult – because of my age and I accept I may not look like the best prospect,” she joked. “I applied for lots and lots of jobs … I just seemed to be filling in application forms and sending off CVs left, right and centre.”

As her contract is due to end in the spring, Cowan, the breadwinner in her family, admits she is insecure. “I have to be really careful about how much money I spend because come next March I don’t know what I’ll be doing,” she said. “There is pressure. The only other time in my life I haven’t worked is when I stopped to have my children.”

After months of criticism, the government shows signs of waking up to concerns about the impact of the cuts on women. In September, a leaked memo revealed that Downing Street was considering a raft of measures aimed at winning back female voters. Earlier this month the home secretary, Theresa May, outlined an ambitious plan to recruit and train 5,000 volunteer business mentors to help budding female entrepreneurs. This week it emerged that Cameron is seeking to hire a special adviser to check whether policy is "women-friendly".

Bird welcomed this recognition but said the government had failed so far to take action that would really make a difference. Fawcett has outlined policies it wants the government to take, including the ringfencing of funding for SureStart children’s centres and pressure on local authorities not to cut services concerned with combating violence against women.

For Cowan, the government’s apparent concern is too little, too late. “[It’s] locking the stable door after the horse has bolted,” she said. “The damage has been done. It doesn’t make you feel any better that they recognise that there might be some harm there after they’ve inflicted the harm on all of us.”

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

CNN: Shock over ‘respectable’ lives behind masks of UK rioters

notime4yourshit:

Hooded youths walk past a looted department store in Clapham Junction, London, on August 8.

Before they started appearing in court, most people assumed London’s rioters and looters were unemployed youths with no hope and no future.

 So there was much surprise when details of the accused began to emerge, and they included some from wealthy backgrounds or with good jobs.

 Those passing through London’s courtrooms on Tuesday and Wednesday — some courts sat overnight to cope with the numbers — have included a teaching assistant, a lifeguard, a postman, a chef, a charity worker, a millionaire’s daughter and an 11-year-old boy, newspapers reported.

The tabloid Sun newspaper wrote in its opinion page on Thursday of the “sick” society described by Prime Minister David Cameron: “The sickness starts on welfare-addicted estates where feckless parents let children run wild.”

But its front-page headline told a different story about the accused: “Lifeguard, postman, hairdresser, teacher, millionaire’s daughter, chef and schoolboy, 11.”

The Daily Mail reported: “While the trouble has been largely blamed on feral teenagers, many of those paraded before the courts yesterday led apparently respectable lives.”

The upmarket Daily Telegraph devoted its page three to the case of Laura Johnson, the 19-year-old daughter of a company director who pleaded not guilty to stealing £5,000 ($8,000) of electrical goods, under the headline: “Girl who has it all is accused of theft.”

The newspaper said she lived in a converted farmhouse in the leafy London suburb of Orpington, Kent, with extensive grounds and a tennis court, had studied at one of the best-performing state schools in the country and now attends the University of Exeter.

Reporter Andrew Gilligan wrote in the Daily Telegraph: “Here in court, as David Cameron condemned the ‘sickness’ in parts of British society, we saw clearly, for the first time, the face of the riot: stripped of its hoods and masks, dressed in white prison T-shirts and handcuffed to burly security guards.

“It was rather different from the one we had been expecting.”

He added of the defendants at Highbury Magistrates Court in north London: “Most were teenagers or in their early twenties, but a surprising number were older.

“Most interestingly of all, they were predominantly white, and many had jobs.”

Read More

Monday, August 15, 2011
When the Boston Globe pointed out that the English riots had left far fewer dead than the L.A. riots, SayUncle responded, “This completely ignores the possibility that some of the life lost in LA was people who needed to shot.” “How many of those 35 people killed by gunshot wounds in the LA riots deserved it?” agreed Snowflakes in Hell. “As long as the people killed in a riot were killed because they were flouting law and order, I have no problem with it.” By this reading, the English failed not only by not having enough guns, but also by not having killed enough people. Talk about a no-win situation! Rightbloggers Find the Cause of England’s Riots: Gun Control and Black People - New York News - Runnin’ Scared (via robot-heart-politics)
Wednesday, August 10, 2011

If you can’t imagine a situation being bad enough to lead to rioting, you’re so fucking privileged it hurts.

(Source: sugaredvenom)

We pretend that “almost everyone has food and can scrape by, and anyone who can’t is just a shiftless waster, anyway” is good enough, and we pretend that the government and upper classes in wealthy countries aren’t constantly conspiring to wage a civil war of economics and access against people living lives of quiet desperation who are accused of being irrational and crazy and savage and uncivilized by their oppressors if they have the temerity to object to their oppression, and we pretend that a sustained campaign of marginalization and denial and subjugation doesn’t amount to a lifetime of abuse committed against vulnerable people by their own government. And we pretend that a government in service to an ideal that ostracizes many citizens by virtue of poverty and others by virtue of indifference to its ostensible rewards is a functional government and not simply a tool of privileged elites. Those pretenses are going up in smoke across the UK. Shakesville: On the UK Riots, Part Two (via robot-heart-politics)