Saturday, April 19, 2014
Trying to solve gender inequality in the workplace by telling women to be more confident is like re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic after it hit the iceberg. It may give the passengers something to do, but it definitely won’t stop the ship from sinking. Elizabeth Plank, It’s Not the ‘Confidence Gap’ – Here’s What’s Really Holding Women Back
Tuesday, April 8, 2014 Friday, March 14, 2014
theatlantic:

I Fought Back Against My College’s Sexist Fraternity

Ten years ago this spring, I entered a fraternity house in broad daylight to see fellow sorority women perform a drunken strip-tease. The event had no official title, it was simply known as a lip synch. Its purpose, if you can call it that, was to see which sorority had the best song-and-dance routine. The best performance was determined by a panel of judges, mostly brothers of the fraternity, and that year, a “celebrity” guest judge: a professor in the college’s government department.
The event was one of more than half-a-dozen competitive events that made up the fraternity’s week-long charity fundraiser, known as Derby Days. The entire effort was held in the name of raising money for a network of children’s hospitals.  But what was really at stake that afternoon was who was going to be deemed the most desirable group of women. And that made me feel numb, and then enraged, for reasons I would struggle to articulate for years to come.
Some of the Derby Days events were benign—a penny war, for example—but most, like the lip synch or the beauty pageant or the skit contest, had a clear message. The winners were the most sexually attractive group of women to a certain group of men.
If you had asked me before I went to college if these events would’ve upset me, I am not sure what I would’ve said. I never considered myself a prude, nor was I sheltered from the world of sexual innuendo. I spent my high school years at a liberal boarding school in the Northeast, where we watched endless reruns of Sex and the City and gossiped about our classmates’ hook-ups.
But there was something about that day in 2004 that gnawed at me. I am sure some of the women who performed in the event got a genuine thrill: They enjoyed performing in front of people. And of course most people like being viewed as attractive. But seeing the event play out in front of me—to feel swallowed by the intense competition, to feel like I was accepting the unspoken terms of the event—changed me. The event seemed to confirm so many negative stereotypes about women and men. That women valued, above all else, being seen as sexually desirable to these men. And that men wanted and encouraged the women to perform as objects for their entertainment.
Read more. [Image: waitscm/Flickr]

theatlantic:

I Fought Back Against My College’s Sexist Fraternity

Ten years ago this spring, I entered a fraternity house in broad daylight to see fellow sorority women perform a drunken strip-tease. The event had no official title, it was simply known as a lip synch. Its purpose, if you can call it that, was to see which sorority had the best song-and-dance routine. The best performance was determined by a panel of judges, mostly brothers of the fraternity, and that year, a “celebrity” guest judge: a professor in the college’s government department.

The event was one of more than half-a-dozen competitive events that made up the fraternity’s week-long charity fundraiser, known as Derby Days. The entire effort was held in the name of raising money for a network of children’s hospitals.  But what was really at stake that afternoon was who was going to be deemed the most desirable group of women. And that made me feel numb, and then enraged, for reasons I would struggle to articulate for years to come.

Some of the Derby Days events were benign—a penny war, for example—but most, like the lip synch or the beauty pageant or the skit contest, had a clear message. The winners were the most sexually attractive group of women to a certain group of men.

If you had asked me before I went to college if these events would’ve upset me, I am not sure what I would’ve said. I never considered myself a prude, nor was I sheltered from the world of sexual innuendo. I spent my high school years at a liberal boarding school in the Northeast, where we watched endless reruns of Sex and the City and gossiped about our classmates’ hook-ups.

But there was something about that day in 2004 that gnawed at me. I am sure some of the women who performed in the event got a genuine thrill: They enjoyed performing in front of people. And of course most people like being viewed as attractive. But seeing the event play out in front of me—to feel swallowed by the intense competition, to feel like I was accepting the unspoken terms of the event—changed me. The event seemed to confirm so many negative stereotypes about women and men. That women valued, above all else, being seen as sexually desirable to these men. And that men wanted and encouraged the women to perform as objects for their entertainment.

Read more. [Image: waitscm/Flickr]

Thursday, March 13, 2014
Here’s the thing: As galling as it is to think of people like Michael Dunn and George Zimmerman daring to call themselves victims, I don’t think they’re being disingenuous. I absolutely do think that they think of themselves as victims. You know why? I’ve never met a racist that didn’t think of themselves as a victim. I’ve never met a sexist that didn’t think of themselves as a victim. I’ve never met a homophobe that didn’t think of themselves as a victim. They’re always the victims…in their own minds. “Oh! They’re going to take our jobs!,” “They’re different!,” “They’re scary!,”I won’t be in charge anymore!,” “I’m just not ready for a black president! Why won’t they wait until I’m ready?,” “They have bigger penises!,” “It’ll make my marriage seem less special!,” “Who is going to make me my sandwich!” They’re perpetual babies. They are perpetual victims. ‘I’m the victim’ said the man who shot an unarmed teenager over ‘loud thug music’ (via azspot)
Sunday, February 23, 2014 Tuesday, February 18, 2014

My professor just made a comment that a man saying he’s a stay at home dad just means he’s unemployed.

What an unbelievable asshole.

Monday, February 17, 2014
Some of you might be thinking, “But if we just add two-dimensional objectified male characters to all the two-dimensional objectified female characters out there, won’t we just make all our movies two-dimensional and boring?” Oh sure, if you want to look at it that way, but what’s the alternative? Make all your characters fully developed, complex human beings? Come on, you can’t expect anyone to work that hard. C. Coville and Christina H, The 6 Male Characters Women Never Get to See in Movies
Wednesday, February 12, 2014 Friday, January 24, 2014